How To Make a Good Speech Stunning

PUBLIC SPEAKING

PUBLIC SPEAKING (Photo credit: IntangibleArts)

Be honest.

To deliver a truly great speech, you must be 100 times more poignant and entertaining than you initially imagine, so its imperative that you have great critics at your side who aren’t afraid to be candid with feedback. One of HubSpot’s marketers gave me a D+ on my third run-through of my speech, and his concrete feedback allowed me to improve by leaps and bounds the next time around. Public speaking is one occasion in which you can never be too hard on yourself. Be open to feedback and eliminate tactics or techniques that simply aren’t working for you. A crowd can feel if something is forced or poorly executed, so invest your time in messaging and media that work for your storytelling style.

Get personal.

Great narratives aren’t characterized by glittery generalities or statistics. Instead, they are brought to life by people’s personal experiences. Scott Harrison of charity:water is a master at bringing his story of starting as a nightclub promoter to his presentation style. He is so compelling that the audience can almost feel the money, luxury, and glamor of his nightclub life, and then he perfectly contrasts the glitz (and emptiness) of that life with the incredible mission and reality of charity:water. Instead of using guilt to pressure people into caring about the world water crisis, he uses a personal narrative combined with beautiful creative execution to bring people to the edge of their seats. People come to see you, so show them who you are.

via Leadership Communication

About

Jim Woods is president of The Jim Woods Group. A management consulting firm. Go here to see his work www.jimwoodsgroup.com. He advises and speaks to organizations large and small on how to increase top line growth in times of uncertainty and complexity. Some of his speaking and consulting clients include: U.S. Army, MITRE Corporation, Pitney Bowes, Whirlpool, and 3M. See more at his website www.jimwoodsgroup.com.

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