To Leaders Who Want To Change Their Organizations But Can’t

Companies don’t change people. The more we enter a technological age where the pace of change increases exponentially the more important it becomes to remember the people attached to the organizational outcomes. The more a leader and manager become accustom to treating people like automatons the more they ostracize people from the objective. Mckinsey provides great strategies below:

Organizations don’t change—people do

Many companies move quickly from setting their performance objectives to implementing a suite of change initiatives. Be it a new growth strategy or business-unit structure, the integration of a recent acquisition or the rollout of a new operational-improvement effort, such organizations focus on altering systems and structures and on creating new policies and processes.

To achieve collective change over time, actions like these are necessary but seldom sufficient. A new strategy will fall short of its potential if it fails to address the underlying mind-sets and capabilities of the people who will execute it.

McKinsey research and client experience suggest that half of all efforts to transform organizational performance fail either because senior managers don’t act as role models for change or because people in the organization defend the status quo.2 In other words, despite the stated change goals, people on the ground tend to behave as they did before. Equally, the same McKinsey research indicates that if companies can identify and address pervasive mind-sets at the outset, they are four times more likely to succeed in organizational-change efforts than are companies that overlook this stage.

  • Look inward and outward so not to marginalize individual learning and adaptation.
  • Focus on people as much as the process.
  • Don’t focus entirely on changing behavior.  Companies that recognize the need for new learning, is to focus too much on developing skills.
  • Training that only emphasizes new behavior rarely translates into profoundly different performance outside the classroom.
  • Leadership and cultural transformations are best achieved when an organization’s aspirations is to combine efforts that look outward with those that look inward.
  • Link strategic and systemic intervention to genuine self-discovery and self-development by leaders is a far better path to embracing the vision of the organization and to realizing its business goals.

Read full article via Change leader, change thyself | McKinsey & Company.

 

Jim Woods, Leadership speaker, Human Resources Consultant, Business Coach

Jim Woods, Leadership speaker, Human Resources Consultant, Business Coach

Jim Woods is a leadership development and training consultant deploying his unique abilities in character based training and strategy.

See a partial list of Jim’s clients. Hire Jim Woods to Speak  | Follow us: Facebook | Follow us: Twitter | Skype ID – jim.woods79 http://www.innothinkgroup.com   Click here to schedule an appointment.

Jim is president of InnoThink Group a human resources and leadership management consulting firm. He has an absolute passion for people development and are constantly refining and adapting his programs in order to ensure that they have the maximum impact on those we serve.

About

Jim Woods is president of The Jim Woods Group. A management consulting firm. Go here to see his work www.jimwoodsgroup.com. He advises and speaks to organizations large and small on how to increase top line growth in times of uncertainty and complexity. Some of his speaking and consulting clients include: U.S. Army, MITRE Corporation, Pitney Bowes, Whirlpool, and 3M. See more at his website www.jimwoodsgroup.com.

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