How The Passion of Rookies Can Embolden Your Organization

 

Image courtesy HBR

Hiring myriad types of employees as a vital aspect of diversity. It is also critical to an organization’s evolution of innovation. New employees are often passionate with new ideas until they have been employed for sometime under the peering eyes of protective silos encouraging the newbies to pace themselves.

Writes Liz Wiseman: For many professionals today, the ability to learn is more valuable than accumulated knowledge.

Our study found three things rookies are especially good at:

1. Tapping networks of experts.  Having little knowledge and insight themselves, newcomers have no qualms about seeking guidance from others. Our study found that rookies are four times more likely to ask for help and 50% more likely to listen. They seek expertise 40% more than their experienced peers, and when they do, they connect with five times as many people.

If you want access to more knowledge, consider putting a rookie on the job and telling her it’s OK not to have all the answers herself. With one expert, you’ll get one expert; with a newcomer, you get access to many more.

2. Forging new territory. Clueless about whether a new idea or opportunity is impossible (or just plain hard) to achieve, rookies readily explore new frontiers. With added pressure to succeed and nowhere to retreat to, they are also more likely to improvise, get resourceful, and focus on meeting basic needs to push their long-shot projects through.[…]

via  Harvard Business Review.

 

About

Jim Woods is president of The Jim Woods Group. A management consulting firm. Go here to see his work www.jimwoodsgroup.com. He advises and speaks to organizations large and small on how to increase top line growth in times of uncertainty and complexity. Some of his speaking and consulting clients include: U.S. Army, MITRE Corporation, Pitney Bowes, Whirlpool, and 3M. See more at his website www.jimwoodsgroup.com.

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Posted in Change Management, Employee Engagement

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