Is Conflict Really A Matter of The Heart or Arrogance?

Leadership, human resources, Management

Conflict can be the most importance tenet of innovative. Innovative in the sense  of discovery.  The reflection of self; a method, a new triumph to find a new way hidden by obsolescence.  Not quite: Pride. Nevertheless  read  this article from Strategy and Business. Jim

There is nothing more common, or more insidious, than unresolved conflict. Here’s an example that could have happened in any office in the corporate world: A supervisor — let’s call him Alex — became aware of after-hours behavior that was negatively affecting the workplace. He approached his direct report, whom we’ll call Brian, and told him that the behavior needed to stop because it was detrimental to both Brian and his coworkers. Brian thanked Alex for his advice, changed his behavior, and they collaborated happily ever after.

Only in our dreams. In reality, Brian reacted defensively and refused to engage further with Alex on the topic. Both of them felt disrespected, and spent the days that followed obsessively thinking about how they each had been wronged and enlisting the support of anybody who would listen. Each of them crafted a victim-villain story that painted his own behavior in the most favorable light and criticized the motives and character of the other: Alex believed Brian was immature and undisciplined, while Brian convinced himself that Alex was an uncaring control freak.

What started as a relatively straightforward disagreement quickly deteriorated into an unhealthy stalemate,

via Conflict Is a Matter of the Heart.

About

Jim Woods is president of The Jim Woods Group. A management consulting firm. Go here to see his work www.jimwoodsgroup.com. He advises and speaks to organizations large and small on how to increase top line growth in times of uncertainty and complexity. Some of his speaking and consulting clients include: U.S. Army, MITRE Corporation, Pitney Bowes, Whirlpool, and 3M. See more at his website www.jimwoodsgroup.com.

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Posted in Change, Change Management

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